Posts Tagged ‘Rechargeable batteries’

Easy Green Tips for Kids!

 Image by woodley wonderworks
It’s never too early for kids to make environmentally responsible practices a part of their daily life. To protect the future of the earth, kids must get involved.  That’s how change happens. Below are simple, money-saving, kid-friendly ideas that make a difference.
  • Start recycling and encourage your friends to recycle too.
  • Start composting kitchen waste and encourage your friends to do so too.
  • Buy green school supplies – pencils, notebooks with recycled paper and reuse last year’s unfinished notebooks.
  • Walk, carpool or take a bus to school to cut down on carbon emissions.
  • Save water by turning it off when brushing your teeth.
  • Turn off the lights when you leave the room.
  • Turn off video games and computers when not in use.  Better yet,cut down on video game time, which uses more energy than computers or tv.  Play outside instead.
  • Use rechargeable batteries in your toys and buy well-made toys that last.
  • Plant a little garden – lettuce and radishes are quick, easy to grow crops.
  • Reduce use of throwaway cups, plates, utensils and use washable dishes and cloth napkins instead.
  • Use reusable, BPA-free water bottles instead of plastic ones.
  • Use a recyclable or reusable lunch bag and put your snacks in reusable containers rather than buying small, throwaway ones.
  • Celebrate Earth Day on April 22!

Click on the link below to watch a brief video created for children on the importance of recycling and the positive effects of doing so.

For more green living tips, visit greenwithbetsy.com.

Recycling Batteries and Winter Bird Feeding

Continuing my series on subjects of interest to men, but obviously pertinent to all, below are two questions from a male reader.

Question:  What can I do with old batteries?  Is it necessary to recycle them? Alan C., Loon, NH

Answer:  In 1997 Congress mandated a mercury phase-out plan for all types of batteries. Some people think since they no longer pose as great a threat to the environment as before, they can simply be thrown away with your trash.  Some communities even recommend throwing them away.

Regardless of whether there is less mercury, it is important to recycle all single-use batteries –  AA’s, AAA’s, C, D and 9-volt.  The batteries still contain trace elements of mercury as well as other possibly toxic materials; they don’t biodegrade and they take up space in the landfill.  Any batteries from earlier than 1997 contain 10 times the amount of mercury in newer batteries and should be taken to hazardous waste collection in your town.

How do you recycle them?  Some towns accept single use batteries as household hazardous waste and many battery companies like Batteries Plus will take spent, disposable batteries for recycling free of charge.   Earth911.org is a great website for finding out how to recycle just about everything including batteries.  Go to “Recycling Guides/Electronics/Single Use Batteries/Recycling Locator” and enter your zip code to find locators near you.

Rechargeable batteries from cell phones, MP3 players and laptops, contain potentially toxic heavy metals and should never be thrown away with your trash.  Again, most communities have an outlet for recycling or disposal, but if not, go to www.call2recycle.org/program-info/.  Hope this helps!

Question:  I like to feed the birds.  Any suggestions for bird food other than seed?  How do you make seut?  Alan C., Loon, NH

Answer:  Bird feeding and bird watching are great entertainment, especially in winter!  Peanut butter, cornmeal, meal worms and fruits and fruit seeds can be food for birds.  Most kinds of beef fat, also called suet, can be safely fed to birds and is attractive especially to woodpeckers, nuthatches, chickadees, jays and starlings.  Animal fat, a high-energy food, is easily digested and metabolized by many birds.  Beware – raw suet becomes rancid when temperatures are above freezing, so it should only be fed to birds in winter in a cold climate.

Below is an easy recipe from the Old Farmer’s Almanac for making your own suet.

Suet Cake

  • 2 parts melted fat (bacon fat, suet, or lard)
  • 2 parts yellow cornmeal
  • 1 part peanut butter

Mix all ingredients together and cook for a few minutes.  Pour into small containers (tuna fish cans are perfect), and refrigerate or freeze until needed. Mixture can also be stuffed into 1-inch holes drilled in small logs to hang from trees.  The recipe can be made all year long as long as you accumulate fat.  Fasten containers securely to trees or feeders.  Enjoy!

Information compiled from: http://environment.about.com/od/recycling/a/batteryrecycle.htm

http://www.almanac.com/content/bird-food-recipe-suet

http://www.allaboutbirds.org/page.aspx?pid=1180

 

For more green living tips, visit greenwithbetsy.com.