Posts Tagged ‘planned obselesence’

Fixer Fair

If you are in the Boston area and your garage is filling up with broken appliances, bikes and other things, head over to the “Fixer Fair” in Union Square Somerville on Saturday, August 16. Talented fixers, supplies and tools will be on hand to fix anything – appliances, bikes, computers, even cars – for this free outdoor event.  They don’t make promises, but will give it a try and if they can’t fix it, they will help you figure it out, locate needed parts or direct you to a local fix-it business.  What a great idea and one I hope will catch on everywhere!

When I was growing up, small appliance repair shops were common. If a blender broke, you took it to a repair shop.  In this era of planned obsolescence with cheap, made in China everything, however, appliance repair shops and handymen have all but disappeared.

Boyett's TV

Boyett’s TV (Photo credit: Steve Snodgrass)

It’s time to rethink our throw away society mentality, and reuse, repurpose and fix what we already have instead of always buying new.  Of course some things have to be thrown out and it’s important to recycle them, but before you do, think first.  Can I fix this?  Can I use it for something else? With the internet, you can easily find replacement parts online and it’s always worth a try.   Who knows – maybe we’ll bring back the fix-it shops of long ago with a 21st century approach like the Fixer Fair, creating new jobs and saving unnecessary items from the landfill.

For more green living tips, visit greenwithbetsy.com.

FIX IT INSTEAD!!!

For years I wanted a blender that you simply turn on and off, like the kind I remembered having as a child.  I was tired of the plastic, LED readout variety with so many different blending options. All those options seemed unnecessary, and the blenders broke often.  I finally found a good, solid old-fashioned Waring Blender. I work my blender hard with chock-filled smoothies every morning, homemade soups and other liquefied food items, and even my Waring blender had a part wear out. I didn’t want to buy a new one because basically it still worked.   I wanted to replace the part that broke.

Image by bcmom Flickr.com

When I was growing up, small appliance repair shops were common.  Since then- in this era of planned obsolescence with cheap, made in China everything – appliance repair shops and handymen have all but disappeared.  One of the best things about the internet however, is that you can find replacement parts on line.  And that’s what I did.  I searched Waring blenders, found my replacement part and ordered it.  My blender works as good as new, and I saved an almost perfectly good appliance from the landfill.  I saved some money too.

In this throw away era of ours, we must think about reusing, repurposing and fixing what we already have instead of always buying new and recycling the old.  Of course some things have to be thrown out and it’s important to recycle them, but before you do, think first.  Can I fix this?  Can I use it for something else?    Who knows – maybe we’ll bring back the fix-it shops of long ago with a 21st century approach and create some new jobs.