Posts Tagged ‘hemp’

Green Your Bedroom!

If you want to seriously reduce chemical exposure in your home, then switching to an organic bedroom is the most effective place to start.  We spend approximately one-third of our life sleeping – that’s 33. 3 years spent sleeping if you live to be 100 (and leading an organic lifestyle you have a better shot at it), so it clearly makes sense to start there.

The Problem?

Conventional mattresses, blankets, sheets and pillowcases contain a lot of chemicals.  Cotton accounts for up to 25% of the insecticides used worldwide and many are classified as possible human carcinogens.  Cotton is also usually bleached and treated with chemical dyes and color fixers.  Synthetic fabrics such as polyurethane foam and polyester are made from petroleum and can cause allergic reactions and even initiate cancer.  Mattresses and pads must be treated with fire retardants, which emit formaldehyde and pose additional health risks.  Less expensive bed frames use plywood and particle board containing formaldehyde that is off gassed into our bedrooms, also contributing to allergies and potentially other illnesses.

The solution?

Buy untreated or natural bedding such as organic cotton, linen, hemp or bamboo.   Often more expensive, but definitely healthier, you can transition slowly.  First buy a chemical free pillow, ideal for allergy sufferers.  Next try organic cotton sheets and mattress pads.  Finally make the switch to an organic mattress made from natural rubber and covered in organic cotton and wool. Wool has superior insulating qualities and believe it or not is comfortable all year-long.  It is also naturally dust mite and fire resistant. Latex mattresses are:

  • resistant to moisture buildup
  • naturally antibacterial and hypoallergenic
  • mold and dust free
  • with little or no toxic substances or ozone-depleting agents used in the manufacture of the mattress

 

You will find many choices in organic mattresses and bedding online, designed for all preferences and all budgets. Retail outlets are also beginning to carry organic bedding.  Target has an attractive line of organic sheets, and with the demand for organic everything increasing, many local mattress stores now carry natural latex mattresses.  Make the switch and have a safe night’s sleep!

 

For more green living tips, visit greenwithbetsy.com.

Paper Napkins or Cloth?

 

“In a Gentle Way You Can Shake the World.” – Gandhi

When I came across this wonderful quote, I started thinking about gentle changes that positively impact the earth.  One such change is to switch from paper to cloth napkins.  It sounds silly, but here is the math.  If 50% of the U.S. population used 3 paper napkins a day, that would total 450,000,000 napkins for 1 day or 164,250,000,000 napkins over a 1-year period.  That’s a staggering number of paper napkins!

The manufacture of both cloth and paper napkins obviously uses resources and energy. According to a report published by the Environmental Paper Network, however, the paper industry (which includes all paper products) is the 4th largest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions among United States manufacturing industries, and accounts for 25% of landfill waste and 1/3 of municipal landfill waste.  Additionally, in the manufacture of paper napkins, the chlorine bleach used to whiten them contains toxic compounds and the dyes in decorative napkins are also questionable.  And, paper napkins are only used once!

napkins

napkins (Photo credit: pinprick)

Cloth napkins alternatively, can be used over and over, often lasting for generations.  They can be energy intensive too, but there are several ways to minimize their environmental impact.

  • Unless it’s organic cotton, it’s best to avoid cotton cloth napkins.  Cotton is labeled the world’s “dirtiest” crop because of its heavy insecticide usage.  Instead use linen (which comes from the fibers of the flax plant), hemp, vintage or your own made from fabric remnants.
  • Reuse cloth napkins for 2 or 3 days, depending on how dirty they get.  Buy different colored napkins for each member of the family.  I jokingly match the napkin color to each family member’s personality, my napkin being green of course.  You can also individualize napkin rings.
  • Wash the napkins with regular loads of laundry with environmentally safe detergent, and air-dry them.  In addition to saving energy by air-drying them, I find I don’t have to iron them!

Paper napkins are clearly more convenient, and for entertaining large crowds, picnicking or eating on the run, they make sense. Just make sure to use recycled paper ones.  According to MotherNatureNetwork, “If every household in the U.S. replaced one package of virgin fiber napkins with 100 percent recycled ones, we could save 1 million trees.”

Most of the time, however, use cloth ones.  Dig out your grandmother’s beautiful linen napkins and find yourself brought back to a simpler, slower time when gathering around the dinner table for meals and conversation was routine. That’s a pretty gentle change to me!

Information compiled from greengroundswell.com, mnn.com and thedailygreen.com.

 

 

ECO-FRIENDLY DRESSING

Now that you recycle, conserve water and electricity, and eat organic food, have you thought about what you wear?

Cotton is labeled the world’s “dirtiest” crop because of its heavy usage of insecticides, the most hazardous pesticide. Cotton covers 2.5% of the world’s cultivated land and uses 16% of the world’s insecticides, more than any other single major crop.  Several of these insecticides are considered acutely hazardous to human health by the World Health Organization, and affect wildlife and ecosystems as well.  The majority of the world’s cotton farmers are in developing countries where children, who are more vulnerable to the toxic effects of chemicals, the poor and uneducated work in the fields.

Image by Jankie Flickr.com

Projects are underway to help farmers change from chemically-dependent growing to sustainable growing, using more biologically-based and organic farming practices.  Cleaner Cotton™ uses up to 73 percent fewer chemical inputs than conventional cotton.  These changes benefit the grower and the environment with fewer chemicals ending up in the soil, the air and the water supply.  Organic cotton protects the wearer too and is becoming more prevalent.

Other options for natural fabrics include wool, silk, linen, hemp, ramie and jute.  Wearing and doing creative things with vintage clothes and fabrics is popular now.

Image by Amy Wild

My artist daughter buys clothes from second hand and vintage stores and restructures them into today’s styles.  She also appliqués antique doilies onto t-shirts, an adorable and great way to reuse vintage fabrics.  (www.wheredesigns.com).

In addition to the environmental and health concerns, there is also the issue of sweatshop labor with hazardous working conditions, exploitation, low wages, and lack of basic human rights.  The next time you go shopping, think about buying vintage clothes or natural fabrics.  The cost of buying less expensive clothes comes with a hidden price.  By voting with our pocketbooks, we can make positive changes in the world.

Cotton information compiled from a 2007 report from the Environmental Justice Foundation with Pesticide Action Network, UK.