Posts Tagged ‘eco-friendly’

What Have You Done?

‘And so this is Christmas . . . what have you done?’
John Lennon, singer

As 2015 draws to a close, think about the new green habits you have incorporated into your daily life.  Did you recycle more? Start composting?  Think of clever ways to reuse an old soda bottle? Take public transportation, walk or bike more and drive less? Cut back on meat consumption? Support local farmers?  Start using organic household and personal care products? Find a non-toxic dry cleaner?

Whatever you do to make your lifestyle greener, doesn’t it make you feel good to know you are doing a small part to protect this beautiful earth of ours? In 2016, consider doing just a little more. Remember, what’s good for the earth is good for you and what’s good for you is good for the earth.

I’d love to hear about your new green habits!  Email me so we can share them with other readers…..

Have a happy holiday and a healthy 2016!!!

Advertisements

Eco-Friendly Easter Eggs

 

 

 

Dyeing Easter eggs with children or grandchildren is a special tradition.  Rather than expose you and your children to the artificial colors and chemical dyes of the traditional Paas egg dyeing kits, however, this year try an eco-friendly approach.

Vegetables like beets, cabbage, red onion, carrot tops, or fruits like blueberries, and spices like turmeric are perfect for making homemade dyes. Even coffee works. Beets and turmeric are especially good. Think what they do to your hands and cutting boards when cooking with them.

Listed below are some simple recipes for making red, yellow and blue dye, which you can then combine to make other colors.

For red dye: Roughly chop 1 to 2 beets (about 3/4 pound). Combine with 1 quart water, 1 tablespoon vinegar, and 1 tablespoon salt in a saucepan. Bring to a boil, then cover and simmer for 30 minutes. Strain, reserving the liquid for dyeing.

For yellow dye: Heat 1 quart water, 1 tablespoon vinegar, and 1 tablespoon salt in a saucepan. Add 6 tablespoons ground turmeric and stir well. Simmer for just a few minutes until the turmeric dissolves.

For blue dye: Shred 1 large red cabbage (about 1 pound). Combine in a saucepan with 1 quart water, 1 tablespoon vinegar, and 1 tablespoon salt. Bring to a boil, then cover and simmer 30 minutes. Strain, reserving the liquid for dyeing.

Many countries use vegetables to dye their eggs. The Greeks for example, use red onionskins to make their traditional red Easter eggs. The Easter tradition in some countries involves wrapping the eggs in onionskins and sometimes adding bits of dill, rice, grass or leaves for a tie-dyed, mottled look. Experiment – the possibilities are endless.

If you find yourself short on time, Eco-eggs makes an egg dyeing kit using natural ingredients from 100% pure plant, fruit and vegetable extracts.

Have fun and Happy Easter!!!

 

Information compiled from: http://www.seriouseats.com/

For more green living tips, visit greenwithbetsy.com.

 

LED Light Bulbs – Their Time Has Come

Just as we all have made the switch to compact fluorescent bulbs (I hope!), along come LED light bulbs, which are now the most energy-efficient, eco-friendly, and long-lasting.  And they are affordable!

LED bulbs last about 25 times longer than incandescent bulbs and 3 times longer than CFLs. LED bulbs and diodes have a life time operational expectation of about 30,000 hours, or 11 years of continuous operation or 22 years of 50%.  Imagine not changing a light bulb but once every 20 years or more!

What’s more, you can cut your electric bill by 80 – 90%.  With a LED bulb, at least 60% of the electrical energy is converted to light.  Conventional incandescent bulbs convert 20% or less into light and the rest is lost as heat, which is why they are so hot to touch.

There are also more advantages.   CFL bulbs take a few minutes to brighten.  LEDs are bright immediately.  The color of the LED lights has improved immensely too – you can choose either whiter or warmer bulbs. And they are durable and dimmable.

Unlike CFLs, which contain toxic mercury, LED lights are free of toxic chemicals with zero UV emissions.

I just bought the CREE home LED bulb from Home Depot.  It looks almost exactly like a conventional bulb and only cost $10. CFL bulbs were a great interim energy-saving bulb, but now it’s time to make the switch to the eco-friendly LED light bulb.  You will pollute less and save money – you and the earth have everything to gain!

Information compiled from The New York Times New Reasons to Change Light Bulbs,By DAVID POGUE Published: March 20, 2013,

http://www.ledluxor.com/top-10-benefits-of-led-lighting,

http://www.howstuffworks.com/environmental/green-tech/sustainable/led-light-bulb2.htm