Posts Tagged ‘carbon dioxide’

Plant a Tree

“The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.” – Chinese Proverb

 

The social, aesthetic, and environmental benefits of trees are numerous.

  • They manufacture oxygen and absorb carbon dioxide.
  • They provide shade in summer and windbreak in winter.
  • The beauty and serenity of trees have been shown to help hospital patients recover more quickly.
  • Trees reduce crime in low-income urban areas.
  • Trees increase property values.
  • Trees help us save energy.
  • Trees improve air quality.
  • Trees conserve water.
  • Trees provide homes to wildlife.
  • Trees provide a beautiful backdrop to outdoor recreational activities.
  • Large and majestic trees are an important part of the community.

According to American Forests, the national urban tree deficit now stands at more than 634 million trees.  Alarmingly, up to 57% of all Amazonian trees, the planet’s lungs, may already fit the criteria of being globally threatened. Unprecedented environmental stresses – warmer temperatures, changes in precipitation, increased droughts – and global trade are making trees more susceptible to insect infestation and disease and therefore more difficult to grow and flourish in today’s world.

Because trees sequester carbon and offset our carbon footprint, the amount of energy a person consumes in their day-to-day activities, it is more important than ever to plant trees.  The average person produces 26 tons of CO2 per year.  6 twenty-five year old pine trees absorb 1 ton of CO2.  36 twenty-five year old maple trees absorb 1 ton of CO2.

 

stock-photo-seeding-seedling-male-hand-watering-young-tree-over-green-background-seed-planting-225149986Planting trees is a way to give back to the environment for future generations and to offset our carbon footprint. Spring is the perfect time to plant.  Plant a tree for a new grandchild, in memory of a parent or a beloved pet, or to honor a special anniversary. If you have no place to plant a tree, americanforests.org will plant a tree in your name with a small donation. Makes a great gift too!


Some information compiled from www.americanforests.org and http://www.bbc.com

For more green living tips, visit greenwithbetsy.com.

 

 

Plant a Tree for the Future


The social, aesthetic, and environmental benefits of trees are numerous.  They manufacture oxygen and absorb carbon dioxide.  They provide shade in summer and windbreak in winter.  The beauty and serenity of trees have been shown to help hospital patients recover more quickly. Trees reduce crime in low-income urban areas and increase property values.   Trees help us save energy and improve air quality, conserve water and provide homes to wildlife.   Large and majestic trees are an important part of the community.

According to American Forests, the national urban tree deficit now stands at more than 634 million trees.  Unprecedented environmental stresses are making it more difficult for trees to grow and flourish in today’s world.  Because trees sequester carbon and offset our carbon footprint, or the amount of energy a person consumes in their day-to-day activities, it is more important than ever to plant trees.  The average person produces 26 tons of CO2 per year.  6 twenty-five year old pine trees absorb 1 ton of CO2.  36 twenty-five year old maple trees absorb 1 ton of CO2.

Planting trees is a way for people to give back to the environment for future generations and to offset the damage done by their carbon footprint. Spring is the perfect time to plant.  Plant a tree for a new grandchild, in memory of a beloved pet, or to honor a special anniversary.  When it comes to planting, the smaller the tree the better.  Smaller trees develop a better root system and you’ll be amazed how quickly they  grow.    If you live in a condo, an apartment or have no place to plant a tree, americanforests.org will plant a tree in your name with a small donation.  Makes a great gift too!

IDLING YOUR CAR

Most people don’t think twice about warming up the car on a cold winter’s day.  We also don’t worry about idling our cars when chatting with a friend walking by as we pull out of the driveway, or as we run a quick errand or pick up the kids from school.   But idling a car burns fuel and emits gasses that are harmful to the environment and to human health.

Image by found_drama Flickr.com

A car’s engine idling for 10 minutes consumes 0.14 liters of fuel, a big waste of money especially with today’s high gas prices.  Avoiding idling can save up to 19% on fuel economy.  Newer cars don’t need to be warmed up anyway unless the weather is below 25 degrees, and even then it only takes 30 seconds.  The best way to warm up your car is to drive it. Idling actually wastes more gas than restarting the car and increases overall engine wear by having the car operate for longer than necessary.

Car emissions can also cause health and environmental problems.  Idling an engine for 10 minutes produces about 90 grams of carbon dioxide.  The compounds in vehicle emissions are known to damage lung tissue and can lead to and aggravate respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic bronchitis, and even heart disease and cancer.  Children, the elderly and those with chronic health problems are most at risk.  Motor vehicle pollution contributes to the formation of acid rain and adds greenhouse gases that cause global climate change. Carbon dioxide is the primary contributor to global warming.

A good rule of thumb is if you are waiting for more than 10 seconds, then turn off your car.  For every 10 minutes your car is off, you’ll prevent one pound of carbon dioxide from being released into the air.  If people left their cars running for one minute less each day – or 365 minutes less a year – approximately 225,200 fewer tons of carbon dioxide would be emitted, and 350 million liters of energy would be saved.  That’s not asking much, is it?

It’s encouraging to see communities now ban idling at school zones and elsewhere.  We are making progress.

Some information compiled from the Environmental Defense Fund, www.edf.org.